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Jepson Field Book volume 10 page 50 | University and Jepson Herbaria Archives, University of California, Berkeley

 
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Title:
Jepson Field Book volume 10 page 50
Description:
Briceland  piling up and flying off into the ravine or maybe breaking the flume. The flume is lined with 1/2 in. stuff which is replaced as worn out. There are flume tenders (who patrol the flume by a foot-board) every ten miles. The lumber is considerably damaged but is a great saving over hauling by wagon. It would have paid in the first place to put in a railroad -- considering the number of years and quantity of the timber. At the upper end sawdust is shoveled into the flume. It is carried down, sifts into the cracks, swells and helps prevent leakage. ::::::::: June 12, 1903.  - One man "rings" while the other man follows stripping the bark. The Indian says there is a little Tan Oak in the Scotia woods but that they do not save it -- cut it down & [?] burn it. - Nearly all the trees are badly injured at the centre of the trunk by fire or rot. The trees are mostly fire-injured or hollowed on the upper side by fire. The result is that [illegible] rot gets in with fatal effect to the log. Trees 50-60 ft high are standing-peeled, two rims being taken off. Another rim could be taken off to advantage but it is too high and they wont trouble to cut the tree down.
ID:
img429.jpg
Repository:
University and Jepson Herbaria Archives, University of California, Berkeley
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