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Jepson Field Book volume 26 page 44 | University and Jepson Herbaria Archives, University of California, Berkeley

 
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Title:
Jepson Field Book volume 26 page 44
Description:
Colorado River    460 ft. ---------- and the oars continually find bottom. While in the current the water takes the boat rapidly along without rowing. The bank of the river lowlands are of the finest cleanest most perfectly cleansed and "bolted" loam. It is wonderful. One of the first plants to take possesion of this lowest bench is the Arrow-weed (Tessaria (Pluchea) borealis). Then follow the Cottonwood (Populus fremonti) and Black Willow (Salix nigra). A great grove of these fills the east lowlands soon after leaving Needles, trees 20 to 40 feet high, very ::::::::: Oct. 22, 1912. ---------- slender because standing very thickly, the Cottonwoods topping the Black Willow (20 to 30 ft. h. mostly). The Black Willow trunks 3 or 4 in. diam. at 4 ft. Then the river buries the trunk 4 ft. deep in silt. Next the river is cutting away this grove, undermining it and the trees fall into the river. In other places long level flats forming a bench 3 to 10 feet above river water is being undermined. The water works very rapidly and the great masses of earth fall into the river in rather quick succession, splitting down vertically and making a sharp report
ID:
http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/images/fieldbooks/volume_26/img138.jpg
Repository:
University and Jepson Herbaria Archives, University of California, Berkeley
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