Archives Main Page | Overview of the Collections | Archives Policies | Searchable Database

Log In | Contact Us | View Cart (0 items)
Browse: Collections Digital Content Subjects Creators

Jepson Field Book volume 27 page 168 | University and Jepson Herbaria Archives, University of California, Berkeley

 
Available:
Title:
Jepson Field Book volume 27 page 168
Description:
Berkeley ----------  tendency to cross-fracturing. A dead limb picked up and struck on the ground breaks into short fragments. Ned Blake spoke of Redwood tops falling in quiet weather in the same way. Redwood tops, wind-killed, doubtless fracture cross-wise spontaneously, that is by season-checking, just as is the case with dead limbs of the Abies concolor, which can be struck on the ground, the limb breaking simultaneously into small billets [?], -- just right for a camp-fire. None our oaks have a tendency to cross-fracture and this fact may help explain the falling of ::::::::: January 1914 ----------  oak limbs in quiet weather. I have never heard of accidents to human beings from falling oak limbs in the Sierra Nevada. - Xerophyllum tenax. Called Basket-grass Lily by Anita Blake. - California collectors. Compare Hemsley's acc't of botanical exploration in Central America (Biol. Cent. Am. Bot.) - Vaccinium ovatum Ph. Becomes a small tree in the Redwood Belt of Mendocino Co. W.C. Matthews, Bot. 104, brings me from Ft. Bragg sections from the trunk of a tree. A section about 4 ft. from the ground is 5 x 7 inches, shortest and longest diameters respectively. -over-
ID:
img307.jpg
Repository:
University and Jepson Herbaria Archives, University of California, Berkeley
Found in:


Page Generated in: 0.165 seconds (using 147 queries).
Using 5.92MB of memory. (Peak of 6.09MB.)

Powered by Archon Version 3.21 rev-3
Copyright ©2017 The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign